About CBTP

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The What’s YOUR Fight family is proud to be a part of the Children’s Brain Tumor Project. We connected to the CBTP through Elizabeth’s Hope after my father was diagnosed with gliomatosis cerebri. We wanted to find a place that was researching gliomatosis cerebr. We met Dr. Greenfield at the CBTP and we knew that this was the right organization for us.

10336781_715364551858464_613865432254462749_nThe Children’s Brain Tumor Project, founded in 2011 by the Weill Cornell Pediatric Brain and Spine Center, owes its inspiration and beginning to Elizabeth Minter.

Elizabeth’s battle with gliomatosis cerebri inspired her neurosurgeon, Dr. Jeffrey Greenfield, to set into motion this pioneering research initiative. Dr. Greenfield joined forces with Dr. Mark Souweidane, who had already spent the last decade dedicating his time to the research and testing of alternative therapeutic delivery systems for other inoperable brain cancers.

The single goal of the Children’s Brain Tumor Project is to bring hope to the patients and families who are confronting these devastating diagnoses. Gliomatosis cerebri is only one example of the deadly brain tumors that typically strike children, adolescents, and adults. Because of the rareness of these inoperable tumors, scientists do not get the funding or attention to research that is needed to find a cure.

The Children’s Brain Tumor Project offers researchers a unique opportunity to utilize a state-of-the-art gene sequencer that can identify each tumor’s unique genomic profile, along with the laboratory research scientists and technicians to interpret the data. This unprecedented ability to quickly identify a brain tumor’s “fingerprints” at the molecular level allows for personalized tumor therapy and gives new hope to patients and their families. In the past, obtaining this information has been prohibitively expensive and time-consuming. By using this information, researchers hope to identify alternative delivery methods and drugs that specifically target each patient’s tumor.

The project is “powered by families” through donations from families, friends, and supporters of those diagnosed with these tumors. Because of the absence of major funding from government agencies or major foundations, the Children’s Brain Tumor Project is supported by those with the most at stake in this battle.
Other ongoing childhood tumor research into innovative therapies is also funded by these donations. This critical effort targets rare, inoperable brain tumors that strike children.

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